Presentations from Responsible Tourism Events at ITB Asia 2016

On behalf of ITB Asia, Wild Asia would like to thank you for participating in the Responsible Tourism Clinics and Forum at ITB Asia 2016. We would also like to thank all our speakers who graciously spared their time to share their wealth of experience and knowledge with us. We had a stellar crowd at the Responsible Tourism Centre booth and many meaningful and passionate discussions took place. Let’s hope they translate into reality, making destinations better for tourists and local communities that depend on it.

If you missed the responsible tourism events, don’t fret. We have compiled the presentations below. Click on the title or image below to view the presentation of your choice. Wild Asia hopes that you glean from these amazing case studies and knowledge. Please contact deborah@wildasia.org if you wish to be part of 2017′s Responsible Tourism events.

 

TOURISM AND CHILD PROTECTION – THE CHILDSAFE MOVEMENT 

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-03-23-pmSpeaker: Valérie Sfeir, International Coordinator, ChildSafe Movement

How can the tourism industry reduce and avoid the negative impacts surrounding the issues of child protection? How can the protection of children be integrated into a sustainable and workable strategy? How can this strategy be valuable for businesses and travellers? With over 10 years’ experience in safeguarding children and youth from all forms of abuse, the ChildSafe Movement, a global protection initiative powered by Friends-International, has developed numerous tools to raise awareness and provide solutions to child protection amongst key tourism industry stakeholders as well as within all tiers of society and the international community.

THE ROLE OF COMMUNITY-BASED TOURISM IN VISITOR DISPERSION AND THE SPREAD OF THE TOURISM DOLLAR  

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-10-41-pmSpeaker: Willem Niemeijer, CEO, YAANA Ventures 

The presentation will focus on the achievements and challenges of the community-based tourism projects of YAANA Ventures. It will highlight a number of projects, including kayaking in the Kayah State in Myanmar, the Banteay Chhmar CBT, Sambor Prei Kuk in Cambodia, and Anurak Community Lodge in Thailand. It will use these examples to inspire others in thinking outside the box and looking for new and innovative routes. With the advent of low-cost airlines, the tourism hubs in the region are under the severe pressure of mass tourism. To ensure sustainability in the sector, we need to have a more entrepreneurial spirit and meaningful cooperation between private sector, NGOs and governmental bodies to support visitor dispersion.

STORYTELLING TO PROMOTE THE MEKONG REGION  

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-28-21-pmSpeaker: Jens Thraenhart, Executive Director, Mekong Tourism Coordinating Office

The Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS) is home to some of the most amazing authentic responsible travel experiences on the planet. Learn how an innovative three-prong strategy will tell impact stories of people in the GMS (in collaboration with UNWTO), where travellers share their #MekongMoments, and curated responsible experiences inspire travellers – all with the goal to make the small operator the hero, and shape the brand image of the region.


MONEY-SPINNERS FOR A TOURISM BUSINESS: GO LOCAL, ENGAGE COMMUNITY AND TEST ECO SOLUTIONS  


Speaker: Dr Marc van Loo, CEO, Loola Adventure Resort

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-43-03-pmBased on the speaker’s first-hand experience founding and running a multiple-award winning eco resort, Marc will make the case that it is profitable to employ only local people, let them run their own businesses, help the local community, and to embrace and test eco solutions such as rainwater collection, biological wastewater recycling and renewable power.

 

SEEING BEAUTY AND VALUE IN WASTE  


screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-44-57-pmSpeakers: Arnfinn Oines, Social and Environmental Conscience, Soneva & Secretary at Soneva Foundation 

Soneva’s vision is inspired by nature’s magnitude, mystery and enchanting beauty. We work hand in hand with the environment to craft beautiful, beyond bespoke experiences where discovery is a way of life. At Soneva, we believe that a business must exist for a greater purpose than just shareholder return. We have created a Waste-to-Wealth concept that sees value and beauty where other views as waste. Through small tweaks in our business model we are able to deliver a desirable resort experience and yet have net positive total impact on society and the environment.

MICE TOURISM AS A DRIVER OF SUSTAINABILITY?  CASE STUDIES AND LEADERSHIP LESSONS FROM ASIA 

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-47-22-pmSpeaker: Pranav Sethaputra, Group Sustainability Consultant, MCI 

Business tourism is a significant economic engine for destinations but are we making the most of it’s potential as a catalyst for sustainability, prosperity and progress? Hear insights on what forward thinking tourism boards and convention bureau from around the region have done to advance their hospitality community and market their destinations whilst discovering top tips for activating sustainable MICE for your own business or destination.

 

PASSION IS NOT ENOUGH: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS IN WILDLIFE AND NATURE TOURISM MARKETING 

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-51-41-pmSpeaker: Alison Curry, Marketing Technical Director, Sam Veasna Centre 

Many wildlife responsible tourism initiatives are developed by passionate nature lovers and conservationists, but they are not prepared for what is required to successfully market in today’s digital environment. Marketing now requires collaboration from the entire organization – from bookings, to operations and field guides. All need to connect with marketing, and a completely new set of skills, processes and techniques learned. Using her experiences working with Sam Veasna Centre as a case study Alison will look at the major challenges for responsible Wildlife Tourism operators, how they need to develop organizationally, and key steps and techniques to achieving marketing success. Sam Veasna Centre is a wildlife conservation NGO achieving successful conservation through community based ecotourism around Cambodia.

THE RISE OF CSR IN MICE

Speaker: Sarah Griffin, Sales and Marketing Director, Buffalo Tours

screen-shot-2016-10-23-at-4-54-16-pmAs the rise of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is increasing amongst companies, so too is the rise of CSR in the MICE industry. From corporate gifts to teambuilding to green venues, more and more companies are looking for MICE suppliers that can cater to their corporate values and the justification of MICE spend. Sarah Randall will discuss some of these trends that are emerging and suppliers who are meeting this demand. More importantly, she will address the benefits this provides to the supply chain and wider community and in Asia.

Presentations From Responsible Tourism Events At ITB Asia 2015

FullSizeRenderOn behalf of ITB Asia, Wild Asia would like to thank you for participating in the Responsible Tourism Clinics and Forum at ITB Asia 2015. We would also like to thank all our speakers who graciously spared their time to share their wealth of experience and knowledge with us. We had a stellar crowd at the Responsible Tourism Centre booth and many meaningful and passionate discussions took place. Let’s hope they translate into reality, making destinations better for tourists and local communities that depend on it. If you missed the responsible tourism events, don’t fret. We have compiled the presentations below. Click on the title or image below to view the presentation of your choice. Wild Asia hopes that you glean from these amazing case studies and knowledge. Please contact rt@wildasia.org if you wish to be part of 2016′s Responsible Tourism events.

ELEPHANTS IN TOURISM: THE GOOD, THE BAD & THE UGLY

buffalo tours

Speaker: Graham Harper, Director of Educational and Responsible Travel, Buffalo Tours

Elephants in captivity are an ethical concern. Rapid tourism growth coupled with inadequate regulations encourage treatment that threaten the survival of these amazing wild creatures.Welfare of elephants must be improved and we believe responsible tourism is the most viable solution. Tourism done right can assist the survival of captive elephants throughout Asia and provide clients with an inspiring experience. This session presents the Good, the Bad & the Ugly of elephant experiences by following the Global Welfare Guidance for Animals in Tourism developed by ABTA, Travelife Sustainability criteria, Thailand’s Ministry of Tourism & Sports Elephant Standard, and Buffalo Tours captive elephant camp checklist.

HOW TO USE TOURISM AS AN INCENTIVE FOR CONSERVATION: STORIES FROM CAMBODIA, LAOS & MYANMAR 

wcsSpeaker: Paul Eshoo, Regional Conservation Enterprise Advisor, Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) 

Tourism is often described as a way to provide alternative livelihoods for people living around protected areas. For the sake of conservation, this general theory may be more effective with more targeted incentives for the protection of specific species. The use of incentives through tourism payments is being explored by WCS at sites in Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. Lessons learned can be applied by others in the industry with little cost and high impact.

BUILDING COMMUNITY FUND & BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.22.31 PMSpeaker: Chananya Phataraprasit, Founder, Asian Oasis Travel

The presentation will focus on the philosophy of Asian Oasis Travel and the concept of sustainable tourism. It will cover the company’s main principles, which are preservation, development, sustainability and delivery, with overview of how each principle is implemented and the result. We will also share our challenges and success stories.

HOTEL RESILIENT: STRENGTHENING THE RESILIENCE OF THE TOURISM SECTOR

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.23.50 PMSpeaker: Hanna Maier, Junior Advisor, Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)

A single disaster event has the potential to cause widespread damage and economic disruption, affecting private and public investments in tourism destinations, and the country’s image and reputation, while posing a threat to the lives of tourist, workers and surrounding communities. The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH is collaborating with the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction Asia and Pacific (UNISDR) and the Pacific Asia Travel Association (PATA) within the framework of the Global Initiative on Disaster Risk Management (GIDRM) to improve climate and disaster risk management and to strengthen resilience in hotels and throughout destinations.

ADVENTURE TOURISM: THE SUSTAINABLE TOURISM OPPORTUNITY FOR EMERGING MARKETS

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.25.18 PMSpeaker: Shannon Stowell, President, Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA) 

Shannon Stowell will provide an overview and definition of adventure tourism and discuss the market and environmental opportunity it represents today. Included in his presentation are statistics on the market value of the global adventure tourism market and results from original survey research into the preferences and behaviors of U.S. adventure travelers (one of the largest source markets for international adventure travel). Included are survey results indicating an interest in Asian destinations for adventure travel. Mr. Stowell will also share information on when adventure tourism product development makes sense for a destination, trending activities, the importance of environmental management and tour operator best practices in securing a competitive position in the global marketplace for adventure experiences, and the triple bottom line benefits of adventure tourism market development.

QUALITY & PROFITABLE SUSTAINABLE TOURISM: ECOLODGES INDONESIA’S STORY  

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.26.45 PMSpeakers: Gede Ori Ariandika, General Manager and Steve Noakes, Director, Ecolodges Indonesia 

Ecolodges Indonesia (ELI) is a for-profit social enterprise with an inclusive business model that focusses on biodiversity conservation and improving the livelihoods of its staff and immediate suppliers. The company is guided by veterinary medicine specialists, volunteer environmentalists and sustainable tourism professionals from within Indonesia and internationally. All five of the ecolodges is subject to an in-house ecological plan which has enabled one of the ecolodges to achieve a carbon footprint more than 30 times less than the average in the tourism hotspot of Kuta,Bali.


THE RESPONSIBILITY OF TOURISM 

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 9.17.12 PMSpeaker: Mariglo Laririt, Director of Environment and Sustainability, El Nido Resorts

El Nido is a small municipality in the Philippines. Typical of most of the country’s coastal villages, its economic base was fishing, using a variety of methods legal or not, until the late ‘70s. El Nido’s natural environment, however, is far from typical. It is an area of extraordinary biodiversity and stunning vistas. Doors were opened to Tourism when Ten Knots set up a rustic dive camp in one of the islands. Three and a half decades later, Tourism’s footprint is evident in every aspect of life in El Nido. For better or for worse, who is responsible?

CONSERVATION & TRAVEL: GIANT PANDAS, EDUCATION AND VOLUNTEERING IN CHINA

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.30.20 PMSpeaker: Luo Peng, Founder, Eco Action 

Based on EcoAction’s successful pilots trips, Hainan Tropical Forest, Giant Panda, and Asian Elephant, Luo Peng will explain the holistic approach of integrating nature, wildlife, community and education into her tours. Her unique business model combines key elements that make up a destination – the environment, wildlife and people dependant on it. EcoAction have helped connect urban travellers with China’s amazing and diverse ecosystem. 

BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS WITH LOCAL COMMUNITIES: THE KEY TO COMMUNITY-BASED TOURISM 

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.28.32 PMSpeaker: Yurie Nagashima, Business & Development Manager, Kinyei 

Kinyei has been operating two small businesses, a bicycle tour operator and a café, while employing local youth in Battambang, Cambodia. Kinyei has always regarded the partnership with local communities as critical for the businesses to thrive and become sustainable. The road has not been easy, however, especially when the businesses are small, just starting, have limited capital, and need to compete in a competitive market. The presentation will highlight the activities Kinyei has done with the local communities, how we train and manage local youth to become competent and confident professionals, and challenges and lessons learned along the way.

THE NEW PLATFORM TO INTERWEAVE THE PEOPLES OF ASIA, CONSERVATION AND TOURISM

Screen Shot 2015-10-16 at 12.31.45 PMSpeakers: Masaru Takayama, Founding Chair and Supaporn Prachumpai, Secretary, Asian Ecotourism Network (AEN)

As of June 2, 2015, Asian Ecotourism Network (AEN) was established in Bangkok with the aids of Thai government, DASTA. The Network will supply more hands-on connections and relevant opportunities for members working together at a regional level. It will provide more networking and business opportunities, significant information, educational materials and networking prospects to both small and large organisations within Asia. The founding member countries comprise of Japan, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Nepal, China, South Korea, Mongolia, India, Laos, Pakistan, Bhutan, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Philippines and Australia. Be there to learn how you can engage and grow together with AEN!

BOTSWANA & SUSTAINABLE TOURISM

Screen Shot 2015-10-22 at 9.05.26 PM Speaker: Thabo Brian Dithebe, Chief Executive Officer, Botswana Tourism Organisation

Presentations From Responsible Tourism Events At ITB Asia 2014

photo
On behalf of ITB Asia, Wild Asia would like to thank you for participating in the Responsible Tourism Clinics and Forum at ITB Asia 2014. We would also like to thank all our speakers who graciously spared their time to share their wealth of experience and knowledge with us. We had a stellar crowd at the Responsible Tourism Centre booth and many meaningful and passionate discussions took place. Let’s hope they translate into reality, making destinations better for tourists and local communities that depend on it.

If you missed the responsible tourism events, don’t fret. We have compiled the presentations below. Simply click on the title to view the slides. Wild Asia hopes that you glean from these amazing case studies and knowledge. Please contact rt@wildasia.org if you wish to be part of 2014′s Responsible Tourism events.

Cost Effective Ways To Achieving Sustainable Tourism Best Practices

Speaker: Tony Charters, Principal, Tony Charters and Associates
It is easy to assume that only high tech solutions can be applied to achieve sustainability. This may be the case for economies that have very high labour costs and relatively cheap access to technology. In economies where labour costs are low and imported technology is very expensive there are alternative solutions to achieve sustainability and to provide memorable tourism experiences. This presentation will draw on case studies from across the globe and relate the findings that are relevant to the ASEAN region.

Eco Labels for Hotels: Why You Should Commit & What Benefits You Should Expect

Speaker: Nicolas Dubrocard, Associate Advisor, Wild Asia
Eco labels for hotels represent great challenges and lead to many questions, we will answer them during this presentation. We will highlight the advantages of a sustainable approach to face potential environmental crisis such as water shortage. We will discuss the guest new requirements in terms of environmental respect and the green market positioning. We will take into account the impact of competing for an eco label on the staff. We will browse the operating costs savings linked to a sound environmental management system. Finally we will introduce Wild Asia solutions to support your efforts to get an eco label.

Evolution of an Ecolodge: Lessons from the Gobi

Speaker: Jalsa Urubshurow, Founder & CEO, Nomadic Expeditions & the Three Camel Lodge
What makes a lodge “eco”? While” reduce, reuse and recycle” are fundamental aspects of environmentally friendly operations, a true ecolodge goes beyond the green footprint to embrace direct support for cultural and natural heritage, while delivering meaningful social and economic benefits to local people. This presentation tells the story of how Mongolia’s pioneer Three Camel Lodge became recognized by National Geographic as one of the world’s 25 best lodges by developing a successful business model based upon sustainable tourism best practices.

How to Make Community-Based Tourism Work: Multi-stakeholder Success Stories From Thailand

Speaker: Dr Jutamas Jan Wisansing, Executive Director and Consultant, Perfect Link Consulting Group and Education Chair, Pacific Asia Tourism Associations (PATA) Thailand Chapter 

Stories from 13 selected communities from 6 designated areas for sustainable tourism development will be shared. These communities have been on the systematic process to manage the resource vulnerabilities and risks of being too overly popular, together with multi-stakeholders co-create community tourism products to meet market demand based on an appreciation of community local wisdoms. The clinic’s discussion will be focused on how to ensure CBTs are sustained on a long term basis – what’s the secret behind thriving CBTs?

Developing Community Tourism Businesses as part of the Tour Operator Supply Chain

Speaker: Adrienne Lee, Program Manager (Asia & Africa), Planeterra

This presentation is about incorporating sustainable practices that empower local communities into tour operator supply chains. The tour operator working directly with its foundation, is working directly with communities to empower underserved women and youth to access market-driven approaches to create sustainable businesses. There is often a resource gap between non-profit organizations and blended-social purpose businesses that are attempting to benefit the communities in which they work. Without a strong market, these non-profits or community tourism projects often fold and fail. However, when partnered with a for-profit operator, tourism businesses have one of the greatest reaches and spread to provide opportunity for marginalized communities, and allow social enterprises to scale, access knowledge transfer, and develop their first revenue generating programs.

Child Sex Tourism is a Risk for Asian Destinations and Companies

Speaker: Mike Nedelko, CRM & Marketing Manager, The Code

The Code would like to highlight the need for child protection as part of responsible and sustainable tourism and present it in the context of “crisis and risk management”. Even in Asian tourism sphere, the current initial thoughts of “crisis and risk management” may invoke precautions to prevent natural disasters that can impact tourism, such as tsunami and floods. However, there is also a real risk for a destination’s or a company’s brand and reputation when it comes to crimes of sexual exploitation of children or other crimes relating to children.

Sustainable Practices – Small Ways That Lead to Big Improvements & Cost Saving

Speaker: Ruben Cortes, Associate Director, Sustainable Building Initiative, Wild Asia
Sustainability is important for all tourism businesses, rural and urban. There has never been a better time to act for the benefit of your business and the “bottom line”. In this clinic session, Ruben will speak about some basic systems and ways that businesses can adopt to reduce negative impacts on the environment, reduce utility bills and ultimately benefit the business on the long run. The presentation will focus on proven steps that businesses can take in order to reduce their environmental impact in an affordable and effective way.

Burma’s Re-opening to the World: An Examination of Sustainable Tourism Development in the 21st Century

Speaker: Daniel Pliske, Sales and Marketing at Access China Tours
Now that Myanmar’s government has recently begun allowing travellers/tourists to freely enter the country, the formerly non-developed tourism industry is quickly becoming a major contributor to the nation’s economy. With these quickly increasing visitor numbers, tourism infrastructure development must focus on steady sustainability if it is to succeed as well as provide substantial benefits and opportunities for the country as a whole. The future of Myanmar’s tourism industry is dependent on sustainability practices and initiatives and therefore, must imitate its neighbor’s positive examples in order to preserve vast natural resources for future generations. Myanmar’s tourism development and future perceptions as an international tourist destination will have great implications for Southeast Asia as a whole, as they quickly become a key player in the regions tourism industry.

Creating Competitive Advantage through Responsible Tourism Practices

Speaker: Albert Teo, Managing Director, Borneo Eco Tours & Sukau Rainforest Lodge

In a highly competitive business environment, brands are required to push the envelope to create evergreen unique selling propositions (USP). Albert will present three case studies based on the award winning Borneo Eco Tours, Sukau Rainforest Lodge, and Borneo Ecotourism, Solutions and Technologies Society (BEST), a non-profit foundation. The strategies discussed are from lessons learnt after being in business for 23 years. They include triple bottom line concepts, specialized responsible tourism practices that improve operations synergy and leverage on business strengths. Albert will also discuss challenges faced and solutions applied when dealing with community projects

Tourism and Climate Change

Speaker: Joyce Yu, Global Alternative Tourism Network (GATN)

With its close connections to the environment and climate itself, tourism is considered to be a vulnerable and highly climate-sensitive economic sector. Climate affects a wide range of environmental resources that are essential attraction factors for tourism. Climate change will make destinations less attractive and jeopardize major sources of income. There are direct impacts like altered seasonal patterns or coastal erosion, loss of beach area and higher costs to protect and maintain waterfronts. Also there are indirect impacts of climate change like water shortages. Higher costs for risk management for touristic infrastructure might change the demand side of tourism markets or the visitor numbers. Furthermore, the awareness of tourists towards climate change and other environmental issues is likely to be a major driver of their future holiday choices. Operators that do not adapt to this emerging ‘climate aware’ market risk losing market share to more responsive competitors. This clinic will discuss the important relation between climate change and tourism, and will try to show some alternatives and help to promote a responsible and sustainable tourism, which bring not only benefits for the tourism industry but also to the people whose livelihood depends on tourism.

Presentations From Responsible Tourism Events At ITB Asia 2013

On behalf of ITB Asia and the other co-organizers, Wild Asia would like to thank you for participating in the Responsible Tourism Clinics and Forum at ITB Asia 2013. We would also like to thank all our speakers who graciously spared their time to share their wealth of experience and knowledge with us. The outcome was overwhelming and we hope that 2013 will be bigger and better. Please contact rt@wildasia.org if you wish to be part of 2013′s Responsible Tourism events.

Below you will find the full set of presentations throughout the 3-day event. Click on the links below to view the presentations. Let’s continue to “Learn, Be Inspired and Make a Difference!”

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Voluntourism – Are The Extra Hands Helping? by Martin Stevenson & Amy McLoughlin

Voluntourism is a growing travel sector and with it comes the pros and cons of volunteering abroad. For the volunteer, it can be a travel and learning experience, a new way of seeing the world while giving back, but for the local communities it may be disruptive, intrusive to local cultures and traditions or its benefits short lived. How effective and sustainable are voluntourism programs?

Martin Stevenson – Voluntourism Through The Eyes of A Backpacker 

Amy McLoughlin – The PEPY Story 

Impact Of Sustainability Initiatives On Customer Choice by Kumud Sengupta

What impact do sustainable business practices by travel companies have on travellers’ choice of a travel service provider (hotel, resort, tour operator etc.)? A survey was commissioned by Market Vision in mid-2013, aimed to determine the extent to which demonstration and promotion of sustainability initiatives by travel companies can impact customer choice behaviour. The results suggest that, all else being equal, a certain proportion of travellers would be inclined to patronize a travel company whose sustainability credentials are easily visible while a larger proportion would be inclined to go with a travel company whose sustainability credentials are easily visible and are endorsed by a credible third party assessor. A smaller proportion of travellers would not care. What should eco-tourism businesses do to attract such customers and influence their choice?

Be a Hero: Child Protection in Responsible Tourism by Patchareeboon Sakulpitakphon

The sexual exploitation of children should not be a part of the tourism reality, but it is. Although tourism is not the cause of this crime, offenders utilize the services and infrastructure of the tourism industry to carry out the crime. Thus, the tourism industry has a responsibility towards combating the sexual exploitation of children in travel and tourism. The Code is a tool that allows your company to implement child protection for responsible tourism.

Poverty Alleviation Through Sustainable Tourism Development: An Idea Or Reality? by Chananya Phataraprasit, Djinaldi Gosana and Hannah Won

A debate has arisen over the actual effects the tourism industry has within developing countries, and to what extent it helps the poor. The concept of tourism as a means of poverty alleviation has been around for nearly a decade, but there is a continuing debate over its effectiveness. Is tourism actually helping to give families and communities a better life or are here leakages that we do not see? Hear from various credible sources including the people on the ground and decide for yourself.

Bali CoBTA

Lisu Lodge 

Hannah Won – Orphanage Tourism 

Story Telling – How To Communicate Responsible Tourism (Without Sounding Boring!) by Adrianna Tan,  Jeremy Torr and Robin Boustead

Responsible Tourism as tool for branding and marketing is slowly dulling in the background with too many cases of greenwashing and/or boring technical achievements in sustainable practices. It’s time to sharpen your marketing edge and liven up the way you tell your story without compromising on credibility and the great business practices you have adopted. Find out how others have told their story and what travellers are really looking for.

Telling Travel Stories 3.0 by Adrianna Tan, Popaghandi.com

Sustainable Tourism: We All Need To Talk About it by Jeremy Torr, Storylocker

Great Himalaya Trail: A Case Study by Robin Boustead

Presentations from Responsible Tourism Clinics & Forum at ITB Asia 2012

On behalf of ITB Asia and the other co-organizers, Wild Asia would like to thank you for participating in the Responsible Tourism Clinics and Forum at ITB Asia 2012. We would also like to thank all our speakers who graciously spared their time to share their wealth of experience and knowledge with us. The outcome was overwhelming and we hope that 2013 will be bigger and better. Please contact rt@wildasia.org if you wish to be part of 2013′s Responsible Tourism events.

Below you will find the full set of presentations throughout the 3-day event. Let’s continue to “Learn, Be Inspired and Make a Difference!”

Responsible Tourism Clinics

Holistic Property Management by Andrew Johns, Sanctuary Resorts

Responsible Tourism Reporting by Raj Gyawali, Social Tours

Tourism as a Tool for Conservation by Raj Basu, HELP Tourism

Responsible Tourism Forum

Greening the Supply Chain to Increase Profit in Business by Professor Geoffrey Lipman, Greenearth Travel, ICTP

New Media as a Strategic Communication in Sustainable Tourism by Jens Thraenthart, Dragon Trail